5 Fun Games for Kids Outside

There are tons of fun games for kids outside. Some are educational, while others are pure entertainment. Either way, both can be welcoming distractions for your kids.

The beauty of these fun games is that they are flexible and come with only a few rules. Kids can also get creative and add various elements of their own.

Check out our collection of five amazing outdoor games for kids below. Note that these games are best for parks or schools as they require quite a bit of room or special play areas.

1. Tag

Tag is one of the most popular fun games your kid can play outside. One could argue that tag is the simplest of all outdoor games because it only requires players to tap into their innate survival skills.

How to Play

Kids decide who amongst them begins the game as “it.” “It” then chases the pack in a bid to tag them with his or her hand.

Once “it” tags someone, the newly-tagged person becomes “it” and starts chasing the pack.

There’s one rule, though: you can’t tag the person that tagged you. Perhaps it’s a way of allowing the previous “it” some time off to rest.

Variation

If the kids are about 12 in a group, “it” can go as high as 3 to make the game more exciting. And then, there is the shadow tag.

Unlike the default tag, the shadow tag requires “it” to tag the shadow of other players instead of their hands.

2. Hide and Go Seek

Hide and go seek is every bit as popular and old as tag games. It is similarly easy to play.

Besides, hiding and finding is quite a catch for kids. As such, it is one of the top fun games for kids outside.

outside games for kids

How to Play

The play starts with “it” closing his or her eyes. Next, “it” counts down to ten (or whatever number your kids prefer) while other players run off to hide.

After the countdown, “it” starts seeking. The sought becomes the new “it” and restarts the game.

Variation

There’s a reverse version of the hide and go seek in tha game, “Sardines”. Unlike the former, Sardines require only one player to hide while the group seeks. The last person to seek the one player in hideout automatically loses out.

3. Telephone

1.  Telephone

The telephone game can be quite educational and a source of considerable mirth for kids. It also help kids understand the basics of communication.

How to Play

This game requires players to be in either a circular or rectangular shape. Next, one of the players thinks of a sentence and whispers it into the ear of a second person in the same shape.

That second person whispers the same sentence to the third person. The whispering then continues until the last person in the shape. On getting to the last person, she or he speaks the sentence aloud.

In most cases, what the last player says will be a total variance of the first payer who started the game.

4. Four Squares

Four squares is a ball game, and like other ball games, it attracts an energetic feel. For that reason, it makes our top 5 fun games for kids outside.

Unlike the previous three games, four squares need a play court and a playground ball.

How to Play

Four squares require players to play on a square court that is divided into four equal compartments. Each compartment houses a player, ranging from rank 1 to 4 (recruit to the president).

The rule is simple: the ball must not bounce twice in a compartment. If any of the players violate the rule, the player will be demoted down the ranks (for players in rank 1 to 3). The player in rank 4 can’t go any lower. He or she will be eliminated for a new player to join.

Variation

Four squares don’t necessarily have to be just four: it can be six squares. However, increasing the number of squares depends on the width of the court and how many players are waiting to play.

5. Red Rover

Red rover is the most exciting and engaging game in our collection of fun games for kids outside. It is collaborative and focuses on the importance of teamwork.

How to Play

Red rover generally requires a large group of players – say, 20 players. The group is later divided into two teams.

Each team holds its members’ hands strongly on a long line, facing the other team at a parallel distance of 15 to 20 feet away.

Next, the two teams take turns to call “Red Rover, Red Rover, send X to come over.”

The chosen person (X) on hearing his/her name dashes the calling team. X then tries to break any of two-tightly-held hands in such a team.

If X succeeds, its team gains a new member. Otherwise, X joins the calling team. The game continues until one of the teams is reduced to just one member.

So, which of the games in our collection is your favorite? Let us know in the comment section below.

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